Credit: Mosaic

Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening

Today, Iceland tops the European table for the cleanest-living teens. The percentage of 15- and 16-year-olds who had been drunk in the previous month plummeted from 42 per cent in 1998 to 5 per cent in 2016. The percentage who have ever used cannabis is down from 17 per cent to 7 per cent. Those smoking cigarettes every day fell from 23 per cent to just 3 per cent.

The way the country has achieved this turnaround has been both radical and evidence-based, but it has relied a lot on what might be termed enforced common sense.

 “Why not orchestrate a social movement around natural highs: around people getting high on their own brain chemistry – because it seems obvious to me (Harvey Milkman, an American psychology professor who teaches at Reykjavik University) that people want to change their consciousness – without the deleterious effects of drugs?”

“We didn’t say to them, you’re coming in for treatment. We said, we’ll teach you anything you want to learn: music, dance, hip hop, art, martial arts.” The idea was that these different classes could provide a variety of alterations in the kids’ brain chemistry, and give them what they needed to cope better with life: some might crave an experience that could help reduce anxiety, others may be after a rush.

Emma Young in Mosaic.